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The use of ICT in the assessment of students has evolved over the time and will continue to advance due to its effectiveness. Earlier works on CBT Systems have been towards the recording and notification of the student’s final examination score. However, this work, in addition to the notification of the student’s final score, also presents the student’s scores in other forms of assessment. These forms of academic assessment were based on the Bells University of Technology Assessment structure which involves the use of a test, an assignment, a student’s attendance to class as well as a mid-semester test for the student’s cumulative assessment prior to the final examination. Thus, a student’s final score in a particular course is based on the sum of his final examination score and his cumulative assessment.

There have been researches aimed at establishing the equivalence of CBTs with PPTs

Especially when computers gave exactly the same tests as those given in paper-and-pencil

Formats. It therefore became imperative to define score equivalence, which was readily found

In the American Psychological Association’s Guidelines for Computer-Based Tests and

Interpretations published in 1986. The guidelines define the score equivalent of computerized

Tests and conventional paper-and-pencil test in two ways. First, that the rank order of scores of

individuals tested in alternative modes closely appropriate each other; and second, that the

means, dispersions and shapes of the score distributions approximate the same by re-scaling

the scores from the computer tests versions (APA, 1986). The guidelines also require that any

effects due to computer administration be either eliminated or accounted for in interpreting

scores.

 

On their part, Olsen, Maynes, Slawson & Ho (1986) compared paper-administered,

Computer-administered and computer-adaptive tests by giving third- and sixth-grade students

mathematics applications achievement tests. They found no significant differences between

paper-administered and computer-administered tests, and equivalences among the three test

administrations in terms of score rank order, means, dispersions, and distribution shapes.

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